Course Descriptions

Old Testament

  • OT 600—Old Testament Introduction. A study of general introduction, including the Old Testament’s inspiration, text, canon, chronology, and historical setting as well as exposure to the various disciplines of OT study and evaluation of the major critical theories. Note that the issues of special introduction are considered in individual English Bible classes. 3 hours, Required
  • OT 601/602—Elementary Hebrew I and II. A study of basic grammar and vocabulary with translation of Hebrew prose. 3 hours each, Required
  • OT 611—Pentateuch. Content, exegesis, and theological analysis of the first five books of the Old Testament. Defense of Mosaic authorship and emphasis on the significance of these books as the historical and theological foundation for the rest of the Old Testament. 3 hours
  • OT 612—Historical Books. Content, exegesis, and theological analysis of the books Joshua through Esther. Particular attention to special problems of interpretation. 3 hours
  • OT 613—Psalms. Content, exegesis, and theological analysis of selected Psalms. Study of the nature and character of Hebrew poetry. Special focus on the themes of worship and messianic theology. 2 hours
  • OT 614—Wisdom Books. Content, exegesis, and theological analysis of Job, Ecclesiastes, Proverbs, and Song of Solomon. Special focus on the hermeneutical problems of Ecclesiastes and Song of Solomon. 3 hours
  • OT 615—Isaiah. Content, exegesis, and theological analysis of Isaiah with particular emphasis on messianic theology and prophecy. Refutation of critical theories and defense of Isaiah’s integrity. 2 hours
  • OT 616—Jeremiah, Ezekiel, and Daniel. Content, exegesis, and theological analysis of each book. Special focus on the significant political, religious, and social circumstances of the period. 3 hours
  • OT 617—Minor Prophets. Content, exegesis, and theological analysis of the Minor Prophets. 3 hours
  • OT 701—Hebrew Exegesis I. Study of Hebrew syntax, readings in Hebrew prophecies, and principles for using Hebrew as a tool in sermon preparation. 3 hours
  • OT 702/703—Hebrew Exegesis II and III. Advanced study of Hebrew grammar and exegesis. Available to students who meet the criteria. 3 hours each
  • OT 704—Biblical Aramaic. Basic grammar of Aramaic and reading of the Aramaic sections of the Old Testament. 3 hours
  • OT 710—Preaching Christ from the Old Testament. Survey of the historic methods of preaching from the Old Testament and instruction on how to identify and preach Christ from OT texts. 3 hours

New Testament

  • NT 500/501—Elementary Greek. Basic grammar and vocabulary of New Testament Greek. 3 hours each (no credit), Required
  • NT 600—New Testament Introduction. A study of general introduction, including the New Testament’s inspiration, text, canon, chronology, and historical setting, as well as exposure to the various disciplines of NT study and evaluation of the major critical theories. Note that the issues of special introduction are considered in individual English Bible classes. 3 hours, Required
  • NT 601/602—Greek Exegesis I and II. Focus on aspects of Greek syntax that are significant for interpretation. Selected readings throughout the New Testament with grammatical analysis. 3 hours each, Required
  • NT 611—Synoptic Gospels. Content, exegesis, and theological analysis of Matthew, Mark, and Luke. Refutation of critical theories concerning the origin of the Gospels and their relationship to each other. 3 hours
  • NT 612—John’s Gospel and Epistles. Content, exegesis, and theological analysis of John’s writings excluding Revelation. 3 hours
  • NT 613—Acts. Content, exegesis, and theological analysis of Acts with a special emphasis on the ministry of the Holy Spirit. 2 hours
  • NT 614—Romans and Galatians. Content, exegesis, and theological analysis of these two soteriological masterpieces. 3 hours
  • NT 615—Corinthian Epistles. Content, exegesis, and theological analysis of both epistles. 3 hours
  • NT 616—Paul’s Shorter Epistles. Content, exegesis, and theological analysis of the Thessalonian, Prison, and Pastoral Epistles. 3 hours
  • NT 617—Hebrews and General Epistles. Content, exegesis, and theological analysis of Paul’s exposition to the Hebrews and the letters of James, Peter, and Jude. 3 hours
  • NT 618—Revelation. Content, exegesis, and theological analysis of Revelation with evaluation of the major schemes of interpretation. 2 hours
  • NT 700/701—Greek Exegesis III and IV. Advanced study in Greek grammar and exegesis for qualified students. 3 hours each

Theology

  • Th 601—Theology Proper. A foundational study of the being of God, the ontological Trinity, the attributes of God and the decrees of God and their outworking in creation and providence. 3 hours, Required
  • Th 602—Anthropology. A study of the biblical doctrine of man as he was when God created him and as he is because of Adam’s fall. 3 hours, Required
  • Th 603—Christology. An in-depth study of the theanthropic person of Christ, His mediatorial offices with particular emphasis on His vicarious atonement and bodily resurrection. 3 hours, Required
  • Th 604—Soteriology. A study of the Holy Spirit’s application of the redemption purchased by Christ, covering such topics as the ordo salutis, the doctrine of common grace and God’s special saving grace as seen in the effectual calling, justification, sanctification and perseverance of His elect. 3 hours, Required
  • Th 605—Ecclesiology. A study of the nature, powers and government of the Church as well as of the means of grace and the sacraments. This study includes an in-depth excursus on the subject of Kingdom of God and its connection with the Church. 3 hours, Required
  • Th 606—Eschatology. A study, first, of individual eschatology, covering the subjects of death, the immortality of the soul and the intermediate state between death and the resurrection; and, second, of general eschatology, covering the Second Coming of Christ, differing views of the Millennium, the resurrection of the dead and the final judgment. 3 hours, R
  • Th 609—Old Testament Theology. Survey of the history, nature, and methods of Old Testament biblical theology. Applications of the principles and methods of biblical theology to selected portions of the Old Testament (including words, themes, and books). 3 hours, Required
  • Th 610—New Testament Theology. Applications of the principles and methods of biblical theology to selected portions of the New Testament (including words, themes, and books). 3 hours
  • Th 611—Basic Hermeneutics. A survey of the history of interpretation and an examination of the essential principles of interpretation necessary for discovering the divinely intended meaning of Scripture. Special focus on the Scripture’s grid of redemptive history as a unifying component. Attention to the interpretation principles required for various literary genres. 2 hours, Required
  • Th 612—Dispensationalism. A survey and evaluation of the history and teaching of dispensationalism. Course demonstrates dispensationalism’s variance with the Reformed faith. 2 hours
  • Th 613—Introduction to Apologetics. Study of the presuppositions and implications of the Christian faith. Attention to the problem of evil, the uniqueness of Christ, and the relationship between science and faith. Includes a practical focus that integrates presuppositionalism with preaching. 3 hours
  • Th 614—Contemporary Theology. A survey of the history and a biblical evaluation of the doctrine of modern theological systems and theologians. 2 hours
  • Th 615—Theological Systems. A survey and evaluation of theological systems at variance with the Reformed faith, such as Romanism, cults, and Islam. 2 hours, Required
  • Th 616—The Westminster Standards. A general study of the Confession and catechisms, including the “Declaratory and Explanatory Statements of the Free Presbyterian Church of North America.” 2 hours, Required

Church History

  • CH 601—Church History. Study of the history of the church from the Apostolic Age up to the Reformation. Emphasis on the expanding church, the Dark Ages, and pre-Reformers. 3 hours, Required
  • CH 602—Church History. Study of the history of the church beginning with the Reformation and continuing through the modern era. Emphasis on the Reformers, Counter-Reformation, revivals, missionary endeavors, the rise of modern liberalism, and the church’s responses to apostasy. 3 hours, Required
  • CH 603—History of Doctrine. Study of the development of doctrine from early church through the Middle Ages. Emphasis placed on the six ecumenical councils, various doctrinal apostasies, and the church’s theological responses. 3 hours, Required
  • CH 604—History of Doctrine. Study of the development of doctrine beginning with the Reformation and continuing into the modern era. Emphasis is placed on what the Reformers taught, Romanism’s responses, and modern theological affirmations. 3 hours
  • CH 605—Presbyterian History. Particular focus on the founding and development of Presbyterian denominations in the United States. Includes the history of the Free Presbyterian Church. 2 hours, Required
  • CH 606—The History of Revivals and Revivalism. A study of the great movements of God’s Spirit in the history of the church, especially during the Great Awakening and the 1859 revivals. Attention will also be given to various theologies of revival and the development of revivalist methods. 2 hours
  • CH 607—History of Fundamentalism and Evangelicalism. A study of the origins and development of the Fundamentalist Movement and the later New Evangelicals, with consideration of the philosophies of each movement and an analysis of the present status of the two movements in American Christianity. 2 hours
  • CH 608—John Calvin: His Life and Theology. Key events of the life of John Calvin and a focus on central theological themes of his writings. 2 hours

Pastoral Theology

  • PT 601—Pastoral Theology. Practical instruction concerning church government, counseling, and the personal life of the minister. 3 hours, Required
  • PT 602—Theory and Methods of Counseling. Practical instruction concerning issues related to the pastoral ministry, including marriage, family, and personal counseling. 3 hours, Required
  • PT 603—Practical Ecclesiology. Practical studies in the Book of Church Order of the Free Presbyterian Church of North America. Required of and restricted to students under care of presbytery. 2 hours
  • PT 604—Theory and Practice of Reformed Worship. Study of biblical principles of worship and application of the regulative principle with an analysis of various contemporary issues such as exclusive psalmody. 2 hours
  • PT 605—Church Planting. A survey of biblical principles and practical methodologies and strategies for establishing new churches. 2 hours
  • PT 606—Ministry of Eldership. A survey of the polity of the church in the New Testament with a focus on the office of ruling elder providing biblical instruction for effective shepherding. 2 hours
  • PT 607—Evangelism. A survey of the biblical justification and mandate for evangelism, the character and gifts of the personal evangelist, and an analysis of methods of personal evangelism. 2 hours
  • PT 608—Principles of Discipleship. Attention to the biblical principles of mentorship for Christian training and growth, especially in personal and smallgroup situations. 2 hours
  • PT 609—Principles of Christian Leadership. A study of the biblical foundations and qualities for leadership. Includes survey instruction in church finances, legal and ethical issues, and the development of spiritual gifts in others. 2 hours
  • PT 610/611/612—Homiletics I, II, III. Construction and delivery of sermons. Practical instruction on different sermon types with an emphasis on the proper use of Scripture. Preaching practicums in each module. 3 hours each, Required
  • PT 613—Contemporary Issues. A study of issues confronting the pastor, such as church standards, child protection policy, and religious movements. 2 hours, Required